About My Upcoming Textbook

About My Upcoming Textbook

I am happy to finally officially announce that I will be writing Pearson Canada's next marketing research textbook. Given that there are currently only two Canadian editions of marketing research textbooks in Canada, and that the subject is a required one in all college and university marketing programs across the country, this is a great honour. I am also honoured to have my friend and colleague, Ted Langschmidt, as my co-author. Ted is an acclaimed marketing researcher and a brilliant research scientist and strategist. Over the past four decades, he has conducted over 2,000 client-specific research projects and presented at over 300 industry conferences.

Our textbook will be called Marketing Research for Marketers.  As the name suggests, our goal is to to train future marketers to perform essential marketing research tasks for their company and prepare them to work face-to-face with marketing research professionals when the occasion calls for it. The marketing research industry has had to adapt to the shift in expectations of clients and consumers brought on by rapid advancements in software and technology. While competing textbooks have more or less acknowledged this change, there is a need for one that actually embraces it and equips learners with the skills required to participate confidently in the kind of research-based projects they are likely to encounter in their future marketing and business careers.

In deciding on key focal points for this textbook (I will not publish chapter details until I receive permission), the real-world practices of workplaces have been considered. Why focus so heavily on advanced analytics with SPSS when most offices are conducting simpler analyses using Microsoft Excel? Why give equal attention to ethnographic and observation research when companies are devoting more time to the creation of customer feedback surveys and training their employees to track and interpret digital campaigns? Why focus on how to buy marketing research services when companies are increasingly shaking up the industry by conducting their own do-it-yourself research in-house?  Why not equip future marketers with the measurement currencies and research lingo in regard to media—a $12 billion industry in Canada alone —instead of overlooking it entirely?

Finally, what will further differentiate this textbook is the "digital first" nature of its design, including giving special consideration to the way students increasingly read, watch, and learn—on mobile devices in a variety of setting, and even on-the-go.